My Peanut Butter Phase

When I was young, my mom went through phases in her food. There was the red wine and onion phase, the hot dog phase, the chocolate chip phase and the peanut butter phase. Although the hot dog phase made for some interesting combos, like the hot dog pizza she made once, it wasn’t her most shining culinary moment. But her chocolate chip and peanut butter phases still fill me with longing.

I think I’m in my peanut butter phase right now.  Last blog post was about peanut butter pie with peanut crumble topping. I think I even inspired my brother to make a couple of pies. Thankfully,  this week’s recipe is much simpler. It’s a peanut butter and apricot preserve roll.

Preserves.JPG

My apricot and white nectarine preserves with some labels that were my mom’s. The pen is from Wholey’s Fish Market in Pittsburgh!

I bought a bunch of apricots at Costco the last few weeks and made preserves because they’re so stinking good! I made the lower sugar variety this time and they were every bit as good as the regular preserves. I think 4.5 cups of sugar seems like plenty for 7 jars of preserves, right? Normally apricot preserves take 7 cups of sugar! Holy overload, even for a sugar lover like me!

The preserves were so tasty, it inspired me to make one of my mom’s old favorite recipes.  It’s a great one to make when you’ve made a pie and have leftover pie dough. children love this and can help make it too!

You just take the remaining scraps of dough, squish them together, then roll them out like a pie crust.  Then you spread it with smooth peanut butter and on top of that you spread a thin layer of whatever preserves you like. (I’m a real fan of apricot and I think it tastes the best in this recipe.) Make sure you leave about a half inch all around the edges with no peanut butter or jelly, so you can seal them. Then you start as one end and roll the whole thing up. Once it’s rolled, you dip your finger in water or egg, and run it along the edges and press them together to seal up the dough. You place it on a small cookie sheet and bake it for 20 minutes or until it’s golden brown.   Then you cut it up and try desperately not to eat the whole thing in one sitting.

Full roll cu.JPGYou could do a whole pie crust if you wanted to get crazy.  Even buy one at the store, if you don’t want to mess with the whole crust making ordeal. But make sure you roll it out a little more because store bought crusts tend to be a little thick.   Then get the kids to spread it with peanut butter and jelly, and you can all roll it up, bake it quickly, and have a simple, yummy summer treat!

Peanut Butter and Apricot Jam Roll-ups.

1 pie crust (bought or homemade)

Enough Laura Scudder’s Smooth Peanut butter to lightly cover the dough – about  1/4 to 3/4 cup (but the amount depends on how much crust you’re covering)

Enough apricot preserves to lightly cover the peanut butter – about 1/4 to 1/3 cup (again that depends on how much crust you’re covering)

Roll out the pie crust so it’s fairly thin, Spread the peanut butter, then the apricot preserves over the crust. Be sure to leave about a half inch with no peanut butter or jelly along the edge.

Starting at one end, roll the pie crust so it becomes one big roll of dough and seal the edges with a little water or raw egg on your finger.

Place the roll on a baking sheet and bake at 350 for about 20 minutes or until golden brown. For a larger roll made with a whole pie crust and not just scraps, you might need to bake it 30 minutes or more.  Just make sure it’s golden brown.

Eat it warm or cold, it’s great!

12 thoughts on “My Peanut Butter Phase

  1. You mean the famous peanut butter pie that Uncle Bob made for Thanksgiving that defeated Grandma’s Green Egg pie, causing the start of the Pumpkin Pie Contest?

    Oh yes, the Peanut Butter Phase can be compared to the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in our family.

    • You have a much better memory of that than I do. I recall the tinge of green on Gramma’s famous “Nading butta eggs pumpkin pie,” but do not remember that Uncle Bob made a peanut butter pie that Thanksgiving. That was the year she tried to bribe her grandchildren with dollar bills to vote for her pie, right? And I hope you are a peanut butter fan, in spite of what may have contributed to decades of near deadly Tunno competition.

  2. Sounds delicious, Fran, now you have to share your apricot preserves recipe with us! Or have you posted it previously?

    • Hi Monica, I haven’t, but it’s the same recipe on the Sure Jell packet. I’ll go find it and post it for you, or email it to you. It’s easy, just washed cut up fruit, lemon juice, Sure Jell and sugar.

  3. What a great idea and so simple… I’ve used preserves to make tarts with leftover crust but the addition of peanut butter is brilliant. (now I’m craving a peanut butter milkshake!)

    • Oh my God darling, I remember well those days of peanut butter shakes and doughnuts in Clarion. I am amazed we didn’t weigh 500 lbs! But this is good and really easy. I think you’ll be a fan.

    • Thanks for taking the time to read and post a response Leslie! I’m sure you could do one without the peanut butter and have just apricot jam, which might be just as good, but the peanut butter gives it a little bit of salt to cut the sweet of the jam, you know? Maybe you could try almond or cashew butter?

  4. Funny, I was thinking about how when I use to come home, as soon as I entered what we called, “the breezeway” and got to the door, if she had baked pizza or bread, the smell just overwhelmed your nose and any thoughts of dieting were squelched and you were doomed. Baked goodies too of course but the bread/pizza was the most memorable. And, THIS peanut butter & jelly was always outstanding as well. Great way to make something out of nothing. Looks yummy, Fran!

    • Oh my, I agree. Those afternoons, I’d drop my bookbag on the floor in the kitchen, and just walk over and smell all the pizza and bread and festival rolls and couldn’t wait to dig into them. We were so lucky! This was always one of my favorites and my kids love it too.

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