Happy New Year! Start it with Delicious Man Food – Pork and Sauerkraut!

GREAT PORK AND SAUERKRAUT SHOT.jpg

Today, like every New Year’s Day for years, I am making Pork and Sauerkraut for luck. It’s a Pittsburgh tradition and is man food at its finest. Not hard to make, ridiculously good, and includes beer. Men love it. Women do too…especially when paired with creamy mashed red potatoes.

And it’s good all winter long because it’s hearty (especially if you’re back east where winters make your nose hairs freeze) delicious,  and a good hot meal. An added perk is, it looks like the food Ralphie’s mom fed their family in A Christmas Story.

This is another great recipe I got from my sister-in-law, Donna and brother Bernie. They were also the origins of my carrot cake recipe and the Danish Pastry Puff recipe, so you know this is going to be good too.

I just went back over my prior recipe for this dish and discovered a big error — I am so sorry! So, I’m re-posting it today. It really needs two 32 ounce jars of sauerkraut, one is not enough. So, if you ever made it and found it lacking, I am so sorry for that oversight. The other weird thing about this recipe is if you cover the pan with aluminum foil, something strange happens to the foil. It starts to pit or disintegrate because of the acidity of the vinegar in the sauerkraut combined with the barbecue sauce. If you can, use a pan with a metal or glass cover instead of foil. I read that the tiny particles won’t hurt you, but who wants to eat foil?

Good table shot

I have a few resolutions this year, including approaching life with less fear and more determination.  I have a few books on my table that are helpful right now, including a Christmas gift from my friend, Dawn. It’s called “Almost Everything” by Anne Lamott and is about hope. Without hope, we have nothing, so I love anything that can keep hope alive and well in the world. I’m also reading “The Power of Starting Something Stupid,” by Richie Norton. Those two, and an old favorite, “Tattoos on the Heart,” by Father Gregory Boyle (which I’m hoping is making me a more compassionate person) are a good way to start 2019.

Last year ended with too much loss for me. Let’s hope 2019 brings us all the health, happiness, prosperity and common sense leadership we need to be comfortable and safe in the world.  Thanks for always reading.  Here’s some hearty man food to get you through 2019.

Man Food – Lucky Pork and Sauerkraut

Here it is before cooking, ready to be covered and bake for three hours.

Here it is before cooking, ready to be covered and bake for three hours.

2 – 32 oz. jars sauerkraut

1 – 12 oz bottle of beer (Miller or Bud light works)

1 pork shoulder roast – about 4 pounds — sliced about 1 inch thick (about 6 to 10 pork slices)

1/2 to 1 lb of Polksa Kielbassa sliced into 2 to 3 inch pieces

Garlic salt

Meat tenderizer

1 large apple shredded

1 large onion chopped

Bull’s Eye Regular Barbecue Sauce

Take the pork and slice it into 1 inch slices.  Lay slices on sprayed baking sheet or large casserole dish and sprinkle with meat tenderizer and garlic salt.  Place it, uncovered, in the oven about 45 minutes – until just cooked.

While pork is cooking. Remove sauerkraut from  the jars and drain out juice.  You don’t have to squeeze it, just drain it. Place drained sauerkraut in large bowl.  Chop onion into a small dice.  (I use the food processor because I hate crying when I chop onions – and it’s easy!) Process apple into small dice also.  (It’s ok if it’s a little mushy looking.) Add apple and onion to drained sauerkraut and mix well.

Remove pork from oven. (There will be juice in the bottom of the pan – I leave it in there for flavor.) Place sauerkraut-apple mixture evenly over the pork. Place in chopped kielbassa pieces wherever they fit. Pour the whole beer into the pan then drizzle barbecue sauce over the sauerkraut. Cover with a glass baking lid or  casserole cover because if you use aluminum foil, it will pit and start to disintegrate in tiny spots because of the acid in the sauerkraut. (It’s not horrible, but you probably don’t want to eat that.) I used a cookie sheet to cover mine and that worked. Bake at 350 for three hours or until the pork is fork tender. Serve with mashed potatoes.

Mashed Potatoes 

8 large red-skinned potatoes cut into 1 inch chunks

1 cup or more of half and half (or whipping cream if you want them to be really decadent and killer good)

1 stick of butter (melted)

Sea Salt

Scrub the potatoes and remove any eyes, then chop them into eighths (or smaller)and place them in a large pot. (I don’t peel them because the skin is supposed to be where the nutrients are, plus with red potatoes,  the skin is so thin it really doesn’t detract from the taste at all.) Fill the pot so the water  is about an inch over the top of the potatoes and let them boil.  While they are cooking, take a small pan and put the butter in to melt. Do not let it brown.  Set it aside.

When the potatoes can be easily pierced with a fork, drain them and immediately add the butter and mix it into the potatoes. I read somewhere this makes the potatoes fluffier and creamier, and in my experience that is so true.  Then add the half and half, or whipping cream (or do a mixture of half and half and whipping cream).

But take heed! (Once, in my 20’s,  I made the mistake of draining the potatoes and waiting a while to add the butter and half and half, and they were like stucco!  You could have plastered walls with them. I never lived it down.) I use a hand mixer and just mix them with the half and half and butter, until they reach a creamy consistency I like. Then I add the salt to taste.  (If you want to get crazy you can rice them with a ricer, but I never take the time to do that and they turn out fine.)  Then serve them with a little dollop of butter in the middle.

It’s National Tie One On Day!!!

Fran in 50's apron

Me, in my younger days, having tied one one.

Today is National Tie One On Day. If you want to go out and get wasted, be my guest. But I will be in the kitchen tying an apron around my waist – which is the real meaning behind the day, according to the National Day Calendar. Since it’s the day before Thanksgiving, tying on an apron is what most red-blooded Americans will be doing. I’m proud to say I’m one of them.

I will also be making and sharing some food, since my two kids will be here for Thanksgiving and my other son and his family are visiting this weekend. I get to see sweet Brandon, Ingrid and those cute little blonde-headed grandkids, who call me Fran-ma…since I’m not technically their Grandma. But try to convince me of that. Continue reading

Persimmon Cookies – Fall is in the Air!

group persimmon shot.JPG

Persimmon cookies with cream cheese frosting.

There is nothing like the first cool wave of fall after a long, hot  summer. The day you actually get to wear a sweater or pull out that corduroy jacket  is the best!

God I love and miss those days! We don’t get fall until mid to late November here and that means about six trees in southern California turn red or orange.  But they sure do look great when they turn. I make a point to go for a walk down the one street I know that has autumnal foliage and always kick through the leaves.

I live in an area where persimmons are very popular and I love them, but only after they’ve totally ripened. Continue reading

Uncle Richard’s Meatballs and Sauce!

edited Uncle Richard in sauce stained apron

Uncle Richard and his son, Rich, in their fully equipped basement kitchen – because what’s an Italian home without two kitchens?

Today is my Uncle Richard’s 89th Birthday.  To honor him, I’m posting my most prized possession, my video of him showing me how to make meatballs and sauce. (It’s at the end of this post.) It was the highlight of my year!

Most people’s bucket lists are filled with things like: Stay in a Scottish castle, or dance in the sand in Greece. But at the top of my list has always been: Cook with Uncle Richard and learn the secret to his meatballs and sauce. The opportunity has eluded me for years, but every time I’d visit Pennsylvania, I went in hope it would happen. Continue reading

My Peanut Butter Phase

When I was young, my mom went through phases in her food. There was the red wine and onion phase, the hot dog phase, the chocolate chip phase and the peanut butter phase. Although the hot dog phase made for some interesting combos, like the hot dog pizza she made once, it wasn’t her most shining culinary moment. But her chocolate chip and peanut butter phases still fill me with longing.

I think I’m in my peanut butter phase right now.  Last blog post was about peanut butter pie with peanut crumble topping. I think I even inspired my brother to make a couple of pies. Thankfully,  this week’s recipe is much simpler. It’s a peanut butter and apricot preserve roll.

Preserves.JPG

My apricot and white nectarine preserves with some labels that were my mom’s. The pen is from Wholey’s Fish Market in Pittsburgh!

I bought a bunch of apricots at Costco the last few weeks and made preserves because they’re so stinking good! I made the lower sugar variety this time and they were every bit as good as the regular preserves. I think 4.5 cups of sugar seems like plenty for 7 jars of preserves, right? Normally apricot preserves take 7 cups of sugar! Holy overload, even for a sugar lover like me!

The preserves were so tasty, it inspired me to make one of my mom’s old favorite recipes.  It’s a great one to make when you’ve made a pie and have leftover pie dough. children love this and can help make it too!

You just take the remaining scraps of dough, squish them together, then roll them out like a pie crust.  Then you spread it with smooth peanut butter and on top of that you spread a thin layer of whatever preserves you like. (I’m a real fan of apricot and I think it tastes the best in this recipe.) Make sure you leave about a half inch all around the edges with no peanut butter or jelly, so you can seal them. Then you start as one end and roll the whole thing up. Once it’s rolled, you dip your finger in water or egg, and run it along the edges and press them together to seal up the dough. You place it on a small cookie sheet and bake it for 20 minutes or until it’s golden brown.   Then you cut it up and try desperately not to eat the whole thing in one sitting.

Full roll cu.JPGYou could do a whole pie crust if you wanted to get crazy.  Even buy one at the store, if you don’t want to mess with the whole crust making ordeal. But make sure you roll it out a little more because store bought crusts tend to be a little thick.   Then get the kids to spread it with peanut butter and jelly, and you can all roll it up, bake it quickly, and have a simple, yummy summer treat!

Peanut Butter and Apricot Jam Roll-ups.

1 pie crust (bought or homemade)

Enough Laura Scudder’s Smooth Peanut butter to lightly cover the dough – about  1/4 to 3/4 cup (but the amount depends on how much crust you’re covering)

Enough apricot preserves to lightly cover the peanut butter – about 1/4 to 1/3 cup (again that depends on how much crust you’re covering)

Roll out the pie crust so it’s fairly thin, Spread the peanut butter, then the apricot preserves over the crust. Be sure to leave about a half inch with no peanut butter or jelly along the edge.

Starting at one end, roll the pie crust so it becomes one big roll of dough and seal the edges with a little water or raw egg on your finger.

Place the roll on a baking sheet and bake at 350 for about 20 minutes or until golden brown. For a larger roll made with a whole pie crust and not just scraps, you might need to bake it 30 minutes or more.  Just make sure it’s golden brown.

Eat it warm or cold, it’s great!

Finally, A Carrot Cake Victory

Bob and Debra

Debra Deyan with her late husband, Bob after winning the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Audio Publishers Association.

Today, my friend Nicol Zanzarella (audiobook reader and actress extraordinaire) and I decided we needed to take our friend Debra Deyan, owner of Deyan Audio, out for a belated birthday lunch. Deyan Audio records audiobooks and has won so many Audie Awards (the audiobook equivalent of the Oscars) it’s almost unfair.  Deb and Nicol are amazing, and two of the most driven, dedicated people I know, so getting together with them is always a treat for me.

I decided to surprise Deb with “Fran’s Clearly Superior Carrot Cake” for Deb’s birthday because it’s her favorite.  I called this blog, “Finally, A Carrot Cake Victory,” because last time I wrote about my carrot cake, it was a cake-off with my friend, Joan, and I came in second.  Well, I was vindicated by the popular vote this time around and couldn’t have been happier. Honestly, my self-esteem clearly needs so much propping up sometimes!

We went to a  restaurant in Burbank called Market City Cafe. As soon as we walked in, the waitress was so sweet, she asked if she could put the cake in the refrigerator for us!  How many places do that? Usually they give you the stink eye for not buying their dessert!

Then we sat on the patio and talked for a few hours, which was wonderful.  As we were wrapping it up, our fabulous waitress (I think her name was Alexa, but I could be totally wrong)  got the cake out and put the candles on it for me. (All I had was the 22 left from my daughter’s birthday, so I brought them because who doesn’t want to be 22 again?)

Fran's Carrot Cake

Fran’s Clearly Superior Carrot Cake, it’s almost healthy!

Alexa brought it out lit and ready to go.  (I’m so mad I didn’t get a photo of any of this!) So, since our waitress was so nice I told her she could have a slice.  She was eating it in the back where another server saw. She asked if he wanted a bite, and he dismissed it, saying his grandmother’s was the best.

He begrudgingly took a bite, and became a convert. He liked it so much, he came to our table and said, “Who made the cake?” I said I did and he said it was better than his grandmother’s, but he would never tell her that. Honest to God, for a baker that is the highest compliment you can get! I was beaming.

Then, because we were sitting outside, a woman walking past, who apparently had just eaten there, asked if it was the restaurant’s cake. We said no, then she asked if she could have a piece. (Gutsy, but kind of funny!) Then Alexa asked if I would share the recipe and if she could have a piece to take back to her boyfriend. It was kind of like a feeding frenzy, minus the sharks. I wondered who else might come along and want some.

I took the opportunity to hand out a few of my blog business cards, where my carrot cake recipe lives, and enjoyed basking in the warmth of cake adulation. When you get fantastic feedback on something you’ve made — it feels like applause and totally makes your day. Sitting with an accomplished actress and a business tycoon could make a person feel a little insecure, but the accolades propped me right up. I completely understand why my mother loved food praise. It was her moment on stage, every day.

Maybe that’s why I cook so much, I’m just starved for attention. Well, today I got it and it was great! Now you know how shallow I am. The link to Fran’s Clearly Superior Carrot Cake is above, but in case you missed it, I’m posting it again. There seems to be a demand.

Fran’s Clearly Superior Carrot Cake

(This would never exist if it wasn’t for Donna Tunno’s Award Winning Carrot Cake recipe, with which I took some liberties.)

Carrot cake recipes

Donna’s neatly printed card, smeared by many bakings, then my adaptation underneath.

2 c. flour

2 tsp. baking powder

2 tsp. baking soda

2 tsp. cinnamon

1 tsp. salt

1 cup chopped toasted pecans (Toast about 10 min at 350, but watch them carefully, so they don’t burn. As soon as they’re aromatic, take them out.

3 c. grated carrots (press them down with your hand so they’re densely packed but not totally squished)

1 20 oz. can drained, crushed pineapple (process it if you don’t want small chunks of pineapple in your cake but I like the small chunks)

3/4 c. canola oil

2 c. sugar

4 eggs

1 cup toasted finely chopped pecans to press on the sides of the cake (These MAKE the cake!)

I always toast my pecans first, toasting them adds a whole new layer of flavor – trust me! That way they have time to cool before adding them to the batter. I toast them whole, then chop the ones I put in the cake by hand, so they’re not too fine. I put the second cup of toasted pecans in the food processor and finely chop them and set them aside.  Then, I put my pineapple in a strainer and let it drain.  Then I peel and process my carrots, then set them aside. (This cake is some work, but the accolades are worth it.)

Combine all dry ingredients:  flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon in one medium bowl.  Combine oil, sugar, eggs and drained pineapple in second large bowl.  Add dry ingredients to the oil mixture. Blend in carrots and pecans.

Flour and grease two 9″ cake pans and divide batter into pans.   Bake at 350 for 40 min to an hour (test with toothpick starting at 40 min.) And here’s a tip from a friend whose cakes were always so moist. After you take the cake out of the pan, wrap it in plastic wrap, so ask it cools, it retains the moisture. This cake is moist anyway, but that makes it even more moist

If you make cupcakes, they only take 20 minutes, but test them with a toothpick first. If it comes out dry, your cupcakes are ready. Donna’s recipe is for a bundt cake, but I like baking two layer cakes because of the additional cream cheese in the middle. Once the cake is cool, ice it and press the chopped toasted pecans all around the sides.

Fran’s Cream Cheese Frosting 

1 8 oz. package of Philadelphia Cream Cheese

1/2 c .butter

1 lb. confectioners sugar

4 Tbsp. half and half or whipping cream

Pinch of salt (to taste)

1 to 2 tsp. vanilla

Bring cream cheese and butter to room temperature.  Mix well in an electric mixer until fluffy.  Add confectioners sugar, vanilla, half and half and salt. Be sure to taste to see if there’s enough salt.  When thoroughly combined, apply to cooled cake.  Then decorate with dots and enjoy!  So what if the kids laugh!

Better Than Any Other Tiramisu!

I

I’ve been cooking for over a month, but haven’t perfected anything for a while. Sometimes cooking magic happens the first time I make something and I can blog about it right away.  But usually, I make it and it’s not quite as amazing as I know it could be, so I have to make it again, then tweak it and make it again and again before I can write about it.

homemade pasta.JPGLike the homemade pasta I made a few weeks ago. It was good, but too thick and needed salt. I wanted to make it like my Aunt Milena from Italy did. So I rolled it out by hand, but I lacked the million pasta rolling experiences my Aunt had, so it was not a masterpiece. I should have rolled it on the pasta machine in my cupboard that’s been patiently waiting for me for years.  It was good, but not great – who knew homemade pasta grew when cooked? So, back to the drawing board on that one.

EggplantAnd I made some really good Chinese eggplant with red peppers and Sweet Chili Sauce, but I wasn’t sure the photos did it justice. This one is easy, just saute a couple of chopped Chinese eggplant and a couple of chopped red peppers in canola or peanut oil in a large skillet or wok. (I used canned roasted peppers because I was out of fresh and they worked OK –not as crisp, but still good flavor. (You could add onion too, if you want.) To help them cook, add a few tablespoons of water or chicken broth. When cooked, add salt and pepper and pour in about 1/4 cup of Sweet Chili Sauce (you can get it in the Asian section)  and stir to combine, then serve. It’s really good!

Beef BourgignonThere was the Beef Bourgignon recipe I got from the Barefoot Contessa on Food Network’s website, that was a lot easier than it sounds. (Why does everything French sound hard?) It was delicious! My son devoured it. You can click on the above link and get it. I changed nothing in it! You usually can’t go wrong with the Barefoot Contessa.

Maybe that’s my problem, I don’t have a catchy name yet. I’ll start thinking about that. The Cooking Divorcee? Pastry Princess? Feel free to send your ideas.

broccoli soupThen there was the cannoli, which did make it to a post. (I’m still happy about that little trip back to childhood!) Then there was the Cream of Broccoli Soup, which was good, but I think I lost the recipe to it. If I don’t write it down immediately, it goes poof!

broccoli leek quicheAnd tonight I made a Leek and Broccoli Quiche.  But I think I went too heavy on the veggies and not enough on the egg filling, so I want to make it until it tastes like the ones I had in Paris. Their crust was so buttery and their filling, so creamy, I honestly thought I would die from happiness.  The only two places here in L.A., I’ve tasted one to equal that was at the La Brea Bakery and a place called the Coffee Commissary. There’s one in Kenneth Village in Glendale, and one on Olive Ave. in Burbank. Their quiche is fantastic!

Tiramisu.JPGAnd then there was a Tiramisu I made for my friend, Camilla’s birthday, and even though that dessert saw it’s heyday in the 80’s, I’ll put that recipe up against anyone’s.  It’s really good. It’s another one so delicious, I only made two minor tweaks.

So, since I only give you my tried and true recipes, you’re getting my Tiramisu recipe. It’s a great Easter dessert.  I’ve made it many, many times and it’s really good, even if Tiramisu isn’t terribly hip anymore.  Maybe we can bring it back. Plus, I promise to perfect the others.

This recipe was from my favorite Italian place in LA in the 80’s. It was called, Chianti. It was on Melrose Avenue. There was a Cucina side that had big black and white linoleum squares on the floor and casual seating, where you’d go for lunch, and a Ristorante side with deep leather booths, that was more formal, where you’d go to propose.

The food was just delicious. No matter what you got, it was always excellent. It’s closed now, but I found this recipe years ago and it’s my go-to one for Tiramisu. (Tiramisu means pick me up in Italian because of the espresso.) I still get requests for it today.

Chianti Tiramisu

6 Egg yolks (I know this freaks people out, but I’ve made this dozens of times and no one’s ever gotten sick.)

1 1/4 cups sugar

1 1/4  cups mascarpone cheese

1 3/4 cups whipping cream, whipped to form soft peaks (Use heavy cream for a less runny dessert)

2 1/4 cups cold espresso coffee (the original recipe called for 1 3/4 cups but I always run out when I make it, so I increased it by half a cup and it works great.

4 tablespoons of brandy

(The original recipe called for two tablespoons of grappa and two tablespoons of brandy, but I’m not a grappa fan, so I use all brandy.)

48 ladyfingers (I never count, I just use them until the thing gets put together Just buy a large package. You’ll have some left over, but that’s not a bad thing. They’re great dipped in your latte in the morning.

Powdered, unsweetened chocolate for topping

Take your whipping cream and beat it into soft peaks (the stiffer you make it, the less runny your dessert will be).

In the bowl of an electric mixer, cream yolks and sugar until smooth and a lighter color. Add mascarpone and mix on low speed two minutes. Fold in the whipped cream and reserve.

In a medium, flat-bottomed bowl, combine coffee and brandy. Dip the ladyfingers in the coffee mixture about 1 to 2 seconds, letting some coffee drip out, then place them on the bottom of a 10 X 15 inch platter, or a round glass bowl. They get soggy quickly, so don’t dawdle. I use a round glass bowl that’s at least 8 inches deep because it looks so beautiful in there and you can get more layers that way.

Put enough in to make a bottom layer, then pour some of the cream on top, and do it again, with another layer of coffee-dipped ladyfingers, then more cream, repeating layers until you leave about two inches left at the top.

Then take a package of ladyfingers and cut them in half and push the cut end slightly into the top layer around the edges, so you create a border of ladyfingers. Then take your chocolate powder and sprinkle it on top, being careful not to get it on the ladyfingers.  Wrap it in plastic wrap and place it in the refrigerator, and serve chilled. If you want to get fancy, you can pipe dollops of whipped cream in front of the ladyfingers and put chocolate covered coffee beans on each dollop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Valentine’s Day Pastry Puffs

On this day back in 1974, my college friends and I decided we were sick of seeing lucky girls getting roses delivered to them willy-nilly, while we got nothing. So we held a Valentine’s Day Sleep-A-Thon.

My friend and resident artist, Dawn created fabulous posters for our doors that said anyone could participate, in the VD Sleep-a- Thon.  All you had to do was sleep through the day so you didn’t have to witness the floral onslaught. Only problem was, we had to miss class to participate, and we were good girls, so it never quite took hold the way we imagined.

Now, that I’m older, still alone, but much wiser, instead of coveting someone else’s roses, I go buy myself flowers and chocolate. Why wait for something I’m perfectly capable of buying myself?

Close up DPP.JPGIn fact, now I celebrate Valentine’s Day with abandon. I even bake for it, and one of my favorite things to make is a Danish Pastry Puff. I usually make it as a breakfast or brunch item.

It’s a buttery pastry crust topped with another layer that’s almost like a cream puff in texture but flavored with almond extract, then covered in icing and sprinkled with almonds.

It’s an easy recipe I got from my brother, Bernie, who had a food column years ago called Top Fork.  He used to go around sampling food at different restaurants then write about it.

(It’s a sickness — Tunno’s can’t help it, we’re always either eating, cooking , or talking about food.)

ITop Fork Column saved his clipping from all those years ago and every time I make a Danish Pastry Puff, I use it. It’s easy, buttery  deliciousness!

Here’s the original recipe for Danish Puffs, handed down via my brother, who got it from his ex-neighbor Martha May, who got it from her eighth grade Home Economics teacher, Wealthie Crawford, who entered it in a national bake-off and won a prize.  I love how recipes make the rounds. And let’s hear it for one nationality embracing the food of another.  It’s what makes the United States so totally cool. I swear food is the true route to world peace.

I tried a variation on it with Brown Butter Frosting and it was very good, but I like the almond too. Usually Puffs take the form of rectangles, but for Valentine’s Day you can shape them like hearts.  Enjoy them and have a Happy Valentine’s Day whether you’re alone or a couple!

Danish PuffsCropped shot Brown butter

Crust

1 cup flour

1/2 cup butter

3 Tbsp. cold water

Mix together ingredients and spread into two rectangles (or hearts) on an ungreased cookie sheet.

Filling or Topping

1/2 cup butter

1 cup water

1 tsp. almond extract (for the brown butter puff, delete the almond extract)

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 cup flour

3 large or extra large eggs

Put 1/2 cup butter and 1 cup of water in a medium size sauce pan and bring it to a boil. Add 1 tsp. of almond extract and 1 tsp. vanilla. Then remove from heat and add 1 cup flour immediately. Beat by hand until smooth, then beat in three eggs, one at a time until smooth. Spread on top of crusts and back at 350 degrees for 45 to 60 minutes or until golden brown. Let cool.

Vanilla Frosting for Puffs with Almond FlavoringPuff Beauty shot.JPG

2 Tbsp. butter

1 1/2 cups powdered sugar

1/2 tsp vanilla

2 Tbsp. half and half

Dash of salt

Melt the butter and add the powdered sugar. Add the vanilla, the half and half, and salt, to taste. Pour over the cooled puff and sprinkle with nuts. You can use sliced almonds or chopped walnuts.

Brown Butter Frosting (You will see God when you taste this)

1/2 cup butter

3 cups powdered sugar

1/8 tsp salt

1/3 cup plus 1 Tbsp. half and half

Melt butter over low heat in a saucepan until melted. Continue stirring until butter turns a golden to medium brown. Be careful not to burn it. It should smell wonderfully fragrant. Once browned, remove it from the heat and add the powdered sugar and half and half, stirring with the whisk until smooth. Then drizzle over the cooled puff and sprinkle with chopped walnuts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celebrate Groundhog Day with Cherry Cranberry Crisp!

Edited GroundhogGroundhog Day is near and dear to my heart. Maybe it’s because I grew up in Pennsylvania where Punxatawney Phil was a pretty big deal. There’s another reason, which embarrasses my brothers when I talk about it, so you’ll just have to read my Groundhog Day blog post from two years ago where I explain it all. Be forewarned — it involves sex.

Since there is no official dessert for Groundhog day, I’m making one up. Cherry-Cranberry Crisp – it has all the flavor of cherry pie filling with the tartness of cranberries, and tastes great with vanilla ice cream.  It’s perfect for that bag of cranberries you still have in the freezer and it can double as a President’s Day dessert too! George Washington and Abe Lincoln would have loved it and I’m fairly certain serving it can bring about world peace.

If you don’t have a bag of cranberries in the freezer, this is a good excuse to go buy some. Some stores still have fresh ones, but frozen work fine too.

close up cherry cran crispI found this recipe years ago in an ad for Comstock cherry pie filling. It was for Cherry Cranberry Pie, but is even easier and very tasty as a crisp, so that’s what I make when I need a quick dessert. And this recipe makes enough crisp topping for two pies, so you can just save half in the freezer for the next time you feel like baking a crisp.

I was doing fairly well on my New Year plan to eat less dessert, but this dessert nipped that right in the bud.

Cherry Cranberry Crisp

Crumble Topping

1 cup flour

2 cups whole, uncooked Quaker Oats

1 cup light brown sugar

1 1/2 tsp Cinnamon

1/2 tsp salt

1 stick melted butter (not unsalted)

Mix together dry ingredients, then add melted butter with fork, stirring to make sure all ingredients are combined.  It should look pebbly. This is enough to cover two pies or crisps.

cherry cran closeupSet the topping aside and mix together:

Cherry Cranberry Filling

1 can of cherry pie filling

2 cups of fresh or frozen cranberries rinsed

3/4 cup of sugar

2 Tbsp corn starch

Thoroughly mix together, pie filling, rinsed cranberries, sugar and corn starch in a large mixing bowl. Then pour them into a buttered, deep dish pie pan or casserole dish.  Sprinkle 1/2 of the topping over the cherry cranberry filling, just to cover it. Don’t make the topping too thick. Freeze the other topping for later use.  Bake at 350 for one hour to an hour and 10 minutes, or until filling bubbles.  If topping starts looking too brown, cover it lightly with a piece of foil.

Serve warm with vanilla ice cream. Share with friends and strangers and watch world peace ensue.

 

 

 

Why People Drink

Being responsible is no fun at all. No wonder people drink.

I’m sorry I’ve been away so long, but I’ve had taxes to prepare for, outside writing projects, exercising, cleaning and ironing to keep up on, and more.  Sometimes I wish I wasn’t so friggin’ ambitious. But the ambition comes partly because

a. I have no spouse to handle my domestic chores.

b. I’m fairly certain I won’t have enough money to retire comfortably — ever — so I keep at it, because being forced into the labor pool at 90 doesn’t sound good.

And I drink more now too. It’s definitely responsibility’s fault.

It’s only about half a glass of wine (when I cough up the $2.50 for what’s almost Three Buck Chuck now) then I put canned peaches in it and pretend it’s dessert. It’s not Cherry Cranberry Crisp, but it does smooth out the rough edges after a long day.

That’s one of the plusses of having grown kids. You don’t have to be quite as sober anymore, and it’s a good thing because, when your kids are older, it’s preferable to be a little incoherent.

I did take some time out to cook though, and thanks to my friend Dawn, the amazing Key West artist at Heliographics,  I got another wonderful recipe you’ll have to try. It’s called Mojo de Ajo, which literally translates to: Sauce of Garlic.  Man, is it good!

Best MojoIt’s basically garlic sauteed in olive oil, with salt, chili pepper flakes and lime juice. I used it on sauteed chicken, but Dawn says it’s really great on fish. My daughter’s boyfriend,  who grew up in Mexico, says it’s always served with fish down there.

I even used some of the leftover Mojo de Ajo as the oil in the pan when I sauteed some fresh spinach last night and it was great. It had a limey zing I liked. I owed you a good, easy recipe and this is it.  I’ll bet it would be good with other veggies too.

If you have any great, easy recipes, feel free to write and tell me about them. I’m always looking for delicious recipes. They’re my favorite way to spread love in the world and they may be the only true path to world peace. Proof will come in my next blog when I share my Cherry-Cranberry Crisp recipe.

In the meantime, I will try not to let being responsible interfere with staying in touch with you.  You all mean the world to me. Happy New Year!

Mojo de AjoCU mojo

1/4 cup olive oil
3 T. garlic minced (about 4-6 cloves)
Cook garlic in oil until it’s soft then add:
3 T. lime juice
1/2 t. salt
1 t. red pepper flakes (I just did a sprinkle because I have a wimpy stomach.) But you can always sprinkle the red pepper flakes on as you eat too.
I cooked two, pounded chicken breasts in butter and olive oil in a skillet on the stovetop. Then served them with the Mojo de Ajo poured on top.
Dawn served this on sauteed Yellowtail Snapper but it came with this chicken recipe:
Saute in olive oil: Strips of onions, green pepper, and boneless skinless chicken thighs sliced about 1/2″ thick. Cook pieces until browned. Season with salt & pepper.
Pour sauce on top. Serve with warm tortillas, avocado, cheese, sour cream, tomatoes etc.